Visiting Nuremberg

What to do in Nuremberg

Nuremberg has many interesting sights to offer given that it is one of the oldest cities in Germany, experienced good and bad times, and has great Franconian food and beer. Here are some examples:

  • Albrecht Dürer’s House (Albrecht-Dürer-Straße 39)

Visit the house where Germany’s most famous artist lived and worked. It is the only surviving 15th century artist's house in Northern Europe and located right below the castle.

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Thursday until 8 p.m.), 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the weekend.

Public transport: Tramway line 4 Tiergärtnertor stop. Alternatively, you can take subway line U1, get off at Lorenzkirche and have a nice 15-minutes’ walk through the old city of Nuremberg.

For more information, see: https://museums.nuernberg.de/albrecht-duerer-house/

 

  • City Musem at Fembo House (Burgstraße 15)

This is a large Late Renaissance merchant’s house. Here you can learn more about the city’s history, art and culture. Various guided tours are offered.

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the weekend.

Public transport: Subway line U1 Lorenzkirche stop. From there it is a nice 10-minutes’ walk through the historic city to the museum.

For more information and guided tour dates, see:https://museums.nuernberg.de/city-museum-fembo-house/

 

  • Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds (Bayernstraße 110)

This unfinished Congress Hall was once designed to hold thousands of people. Inside there is a permanent exhibition “Fascination and Terror” that looks at the background of the National Socialist regime of terror. 

Opening hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the weekend.

Public transport: Tramway line 6 or 8 towards Doku-Zentrum which is also the stop to get off at.

For more information and guided tour dates, see: https://museums.nuernberg.de/documentation-center/

 

  • Memorium Nuremberg Trials

World history was written in the courtroom of the Nuremberg Palace of Justice. This is where leaders of the Nazi regime had to answer for their crimes before an International Military Tribunal. Visit the information and documentation center inside the Courthouse.

Opening hours:  Wednesday – Monday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Public Transport: Subway line U1 Bärenschanze stop

For more information and guided tour dates, see: https://museums.nuernberg.de/memorium-nuremberg-trials/

 

  • National Germanic Museum (Kartäusergasse 1)

The GNM is the largest museum of cultural history in the German-speaking region. It offers permanent and changing special exhibitions covering a wide range of artistic and cultural topics.

Opening hours: Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Public transport: Subway line U2 Opernhaus stop or 10-minutes’ walk from the main station. 

For more information, see: https://www.gnm.de/en/museum/

 

  • Nuremberg's historic rock-cut cellars

Visit Southern Germany's biggest rock-cut cellar maze at the foot of the castle which were originally used to store beer but also served as shelters for Nuremberg´s citizens in the Second World War. English held tours regularly take place on Saturdays and Sundays at 11.15 a.m.

Public transport: Tramway line 4 Tiergärtnertor stop. Alternatively, you can take subway line U1, get off at Lorenzkirche and have a nice 15-minutes’ walk through the old city of Nuremberg. 

For more information and details on the guided tours, see: https://www.historische-felsengaenge.de/en/informationen.html

 

  • Nuremberg Transport Museum (Lessingstraße 6)

If you are more interested in technology this is worth a visit. It consists of the Deutsche Bahn Museum and the Museum of Communications and is one of the oldest technical history museums in Europe.  

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Weekend: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Public transport: Subway line U2 Opernhaus stop or a few-minutes’ walk from the main station.

For more information and guided tour dates, see: https://www.dbmuseum.de/museum_en  

 

Touring through Nuremberg might make you quite hungry. Therefore, we would like to give some recommendations for typical Franconian food and beverages that Nuremberg is famous for:

  • “Nürnberger Rostbratwürste” and Franconian Beer

There are various spots all over the city to enjoy this typical Franconian set meal. You can find street food booths offering “Bratwurst” for a quick snack but also nice restaurants to enjoy your meal. If you are in the area around the castle (were many of our sightseeing recommendations are located) the restaurant “Zum Albrecht Dürer Haus” is a great place to stay at. Right next to it the “Café Bar Wanderer” is a well-known spot to enjoy a fresh beer especially in the evening. Be aware that there are no seats at this spot, but it is common to stand or sit on the square in front of the bar.
In addition to those recommendations you can find many restaurants and bars all over the old-city. Subway line U1 stop Lorenzkirche is always a good starting point right in the city center, but you can also walk from the main station by taking “Königstorpassage” exit and following Königstraße which leads directly into downtown.  

 

  • Gingerbread

Gingerbread from Nuremberg is a great sweet to enjoy especially during the winter. There is a large number of bakeries offering Gingerbread made from their individual receipts all over the old-city. You will find various opportunities in the castle area, at “Hauptmarkt” or in the area around Lorenzkirche (Subway line U1 stop)

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